DH9: Digital Humanities in Practice


About

This Working Group will lay the foundation for a multi-year digital storytelling and oral history project with BIPOC students/alumni centered on our own institutions' racist pasts in order to envision and enact new institutional futures.

Active since: 2018

Open to New People

  • Syracuse University
  • University of Rochester

Collaborative Goals

In 2021–22, our Working Group held a series of workshops on digital storytelling and project building, with a focus on issues of marginalization, representation, and allyship. Over the course of the workshops, we explored how stories of the past might help us to envision and enact new institutional futures.

Group Organizers

Darren Mueller

Assistant Professor of Musicology, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester

Sarah Fuchs

Assistant Professor, Music History and Cultures, Syracuse University

John Kapusta

Assistant Professor of Musicology, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester

Anaar Desai-Stephens

Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology; Affiliate Faculty, Susan B. Anthony Institute, University of Rochester

Group Outcomes

Our Working Group explored how we might develop a multi-year digital storytelling and oral history project centered on how to understand our own pasts and envision new institutional futures. Our events, which brought together people already engaged in this kind of collaborative work, provided both an inspiration and useful blueprint for how to move from theory to practice. We are still at the planning stage and intend to explore next steps during the next academic year. Our activities helped us to clarify our questions and vision.

Beyond this, the workshops expanded our network at the University of Rochester and beyond. The workshops put us in touch with a range of individuals differently situated across the institution who share an interest in public digital humanities and digital storytelling with a focus on equity. By asking people to sign up in advance, we ended up with a long list of people interested in this kind of work. The workshops also exposed graduate students to people doing archival, strategic, and collaborative community work in non-academic or academic adjacent spaces.