HS11 The Central New York Early Americas Consortium


About

The Central New York Early Americas Consortium is a regional collaboration of faculty and graduate students of early North American, Caribbean, and Latin American history. We foster a transnational approach to the history of the early Americas.

Open

Active since: 2020

  • Syracuse University
  • Cornell University

Collaborative Goals

This consortium fosters collaboration and exchange among History faculty and graduate students who study the early Americas, broadly defined to span from c.1400 to 1800. By adopting an expansive geographic perspective that includes North, Central, and South America and the Caribbean, we promote scholarly discussion across present-day national boundaries. As scholars whose work draws on documents in Spanish, French, Portuguese, English, and a number of Native American and African languages, we are also committed to using linguistic diversity to incorporate a range of historical actors.

Creating a forum for regular interactions and exchanges between faculty and graduate students from institutions across Central New York serves several goals. First, the consortium will give historians from the region an opportunity to interact without having to travel to larger national or international conferences. Although all participating Corridor institutions have at least one early American historian on faculty, many of these individuals have not yet had the chance to meet. The consortium will allow them to develop working relationships with colleagues, laying the groundwork for future collaborations such as conference panels, talks, and colloquia.

Graduate students will also benefit from interacting with faculty and fellow students throughout the region, allowing them to widen their scholarly and professional networks. As cohorts of History graduate students continue to shrink, the consortium will offer a built-in regional peer group for MA and PhD students, while consortium-sponsored events will be critical to students’ professional development. By providing historians at various stages of their careers with opportunities to receive feedback on work in progress, the consortium will serve as a forum for peer review, an essential element of producing good scholarship.

Our working group will continue to meet, circulate, and offer feedback on work in progress each semester, moving to in-person meetings as conditions allow. In addition to fostering a sense of community across institutions, the consortium will draw attention to the strong cohort of historians of the early Americas in the Central New York area. Ultimately, we aim to put Central New York on the map of regions with a strong contingent of scholars of the early Americas.

Group Organizers

Tessa Murphy

Assistant Professor of History

Casey Schmitt

Assistant Professor of History

Group Members

  • Pablo Sierra Silva, Associate Professor, University of Rochester
  • Ernesto Bassi, Associate Professor, Cornell University
  • Richard Newman, Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology
  • Ryan Hall, Assistant Professor, Colgate University
  • Jon Parmenter, Associate Professor, Cornell University
  • Claire Becker, PhD Student, University of Rochester
  • Jeff Baron, PhD Student, University of Rochester
  • Marcos Perez Canizares, PhD Student, Cornell University
  • Lydia Biggs, PhD Student, Syracuse University

Non Corridor Members

  • Nicholas Meyers, Postdoc, Harvard University (formerly a grad student at Cornell University)
  • Deborah Hamer, Director, New Netherlands Institute

Group Outcomes

Student Engagement- Virtual Book Club

In addition to HS11 members, students enrolled in HST 804: Graduate Research Seminar at Syracuse University attended this virtual book club in Spring 2022. The result was a robust exchange with the invited author that allowed these first-year graduate students to engage in a wide-ranging conversation about research, publishing, and how a project can effectively transition from a dissertation to a book.

Student Engagement- Virtual Book Club

In addition to HS11 members, students enrolled in HST 600: Readings in Atlantic History at Syracuse University attended this virtual book club in Fall 2021. The result was a robust exchange with the invited author that allowed these undergraduate and graduate students to engage in a wide-ranging conversation about research, publishing, and how a project can effectively transition from a dissertation to a book.

Faculty Book Chapter Development

As a result of presenting a draft chapter during our virtual November 2021 meeting, one of our members, Dr. Rich Newman (Rochester Institute of Technology) made considerable progress on his current book, "From Saint-Domingue to Algiers to American Soil: The Geopolitics Early Emancipation" (under contract with Oxford University Press).

Expansion of Collaborative Networks

As a result of our hybrid in-person and online workshop in December 2021, which was followed by a dinner, faculty and graduate students from Cornell University, Syracuse University, and Colgate University had the opportunity to meet in person, most of them for the first time. This formal and informal engagement increased opportunities for collaboration, as members discovered shared interests and laid the foundations for future conference panels.