2019 Working Group Activities

Funded Endowment Activities by Research Area

This cluster is well-established across the Corridor, with regard to Philosophy as a discipline, and open to cross-disciplinary work in philosophical studies and critical theory more broadly.

Continental Philosophy (PHI6)

May 7, 2019: Undergraduate Conference in Critical Theory, Syracuse University 

Students enrolled in Professor Paul Fleming’s "Critical Thinking and Literary Methods" (Cornell University) and Professor Gregg Lambert’s "Critique of European Humanism" (Syracuse University) will come together for a one-day conference in the Syracuse University Humanities Center to present their original research in Critical Theory. Undergraduate students from both campuses will present papers and graduate students will serve as respondents and moderators.

Ancient Philosophy (PHI7)

April/May 2019: Spring Workshop, Syracuse University 
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Theorizing Italy (PHI11)

March 27, 2019: Encountering Italian Philosophy with Giacomo Marramao, University of Rochester
A workshop open to students and faculty from various disciplines led by Italian philosopher Giacomo Marramao to discuss his thought, followed by a public lecture on the theme of political ontology.

Moral Psychology (PHI12)

May 25, 2019: CNY Moral Psychology Conference, Le Moyne College 
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CNY Religious Studies Consortium (PHI13)

Spring 2019, Consortium Brainstorming Meeting, Syracuse University 
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Objects of Inquiry: Re/Orienting LGBT/Queer Studies Introductory Courses (PHI14)

April 6, 2019: Workshop, Syracuse University 
Faculty, graduate students, and staff will come together from Syracuse University, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, and other colleges within the Corridor (Colgate, Union, and Skidmore) to discuss what we are currently teaching in these courses and how they reflect, and contribute to, broader intellectual debates across the fields of LGBT/critical sexuality/queer studies.

Well-established before the CNY Humanities Corridor began, collaboration among Linguistics faculty has increased, strengthening their ties across campuses and developing new working groups. They have gathered semi-annually in workshops and were the first cluster to establish programming around a distinguished research collaborator.

Language Documentation in Multilingual Communities (LIN9)

April 5, 2019: Spring Workshop and Planning Meeting, University of Rochester
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These working groups have attracted faculty from various departments and disciplines in the Corridor across the fields of Visual Studies and Art History. The cluster also includes the public humanities and architecture working groups.

New Approaches to Scholarship and Pedagogy in Ottoman and Turkish Architecture (VAC1)

March 26, 2019: History of Landscape and Its Representation, Cornell University
This panel will bring together two emerging scholars who will speak on the history of landscape and its representation in the Ottoman Empire and Turkey from the 19th century through to the present. The featured speakers are Berin Golonu (University at Buffalo) and Deniz Turker (University of Cambridge).

Visual Studies (VAC3)

Spring 2019, Lecture/Discussion with Sheryl Lee, Le Moyne College
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Asian Humanities in Global Context (VAC19)

Spring 2019, The Aesthetics of Neoliberalism: A Workshop Linking Asian Humanities, Global Markets, and Emerging Theory, Cornell University
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Connecting Art Histories Across the Americas (VAC20)

Spring 2019, Writing Retreat, Skidmore College
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Mediterranean Music and Performance (VAC22)

April 11, 2019: Grenada - Tetuan: A Search for the Common Roots of Andalusian and Flamenco Music, Le Moyne College
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Modernist Geographies (VAC23)

Spring 2019, Spring Teaching Exchange #1, Syracuse University
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Spring 2019, Spring Teaching Exchange #2, University of Rochester
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Spring 2019, Spring Teaching Exchange #3, Colgate University
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War, Terror, and Genocide (VAC25)

April 18, 2019: Spring Symposium, Syracuse University
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In an area full of very active performers, musicologists, and ethnomusicologists this cluster of Corridor funding has encouraged collaborative research and performance.

Teaching Exchange (MMH17)

Spring 2019, Teaching Exchange #4, Syracuse University
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Spring 2019, Teaching Exchange #5, University of Rochester
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Spring 2019, Teaching Exchange #6, Cornell University
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Spring 2019, Teaching Exchange #7, Cornell University
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Improvisation in Theory and Practice (MMH18)

March 29-30, 2019: Syracuse Legacies Organ Conference, Syracuse University
William Porter, internationally-acclaimed performer, improviser, and professor of organ at the Eastman School of Music, will give a masterclass for organ students. Porter will also present a solo organ concert featuring improvisation on the historic Holtkamp organ in Setnor Auditorium. These events are part of a three-day conference.

South Asian Media and Performance Cultures (MP1)

January 31-February 1, 2019: Writing Retreat and Workshop #3, University of Rochester
Film screening and planning meeting with the Curator of Film Screenings at the George Eastman Museum in planning for a symposium on Indian cinema to be held next academic year.

April 20-21, 2019: Colloquium with Visiting Scholars, University of Rochester
In this colloquium with several area scholars, we will share and discuss each other's work, write together, and tour the South Asian film collection at the Eastman Museum to lay the groundwork for next year's symposium.

This cluster has identified common interests on all campuses in digital theory and culture; computing for literary and historical research; as well as artistic explorations in music, architecture, and art.

Global Digital Humanities (DH3)

March 29, 2019: Digital Diaspora Speaker Event with Patrick Jagoda, University of Rochester
Patrick Jagoda (University of Chicago) will speak on the relationship between networks as they relate to global politics and diaspora.

March 29-30, 2019: Digital Diaspora Colloquium, University of Rochester
The colloquium will hold a 2-day event consisting of pre-formed workshops facilitated by the invited scholars and centered around their work-in-progress research under the theme "Digital Diaspora."

Spring 2019, Project Showcase, University of Rochester
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Spring 2019, End-of-Year Meeting, Syracuse University
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Digital Humanities in Practice (DH9)

Spring 2019, Digital Humanities Student Research Symposium, Syracuse University
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Reconstruction, Structural Analysis, and Conservation of Ancient Monuments in Coastal Ghana (DH10)

February 22, 2019: Discovering Ghana's Past: Interdisciplinary Colloquium, Syracuse University
This colloquium highlights current, interdisciplinary research into Ghana's past. Participants will present on varied aspects of Ghana's archaeology and history, and on the preservation, structural assessment and interpretation of the European forts, castles, and trading posts established in coastal Ghana between the late fifteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

This cluster was proposed on the basis of shared strengths and faculty resources in languages and literatures across the Corridor, including faculty from regional liberal arts colleges and universities. Existing working groups include those collaborating on Victorian, 18th Century, and Early Modern periods and others working within ethnic studies and international literature.

Incarceration and Decarceration (LLC5)

March 7, 2019: Futures Matter: Five Pedagogical Stances for Shifting Toward Justice, Syracuse University 
In her book, Justice on Both Sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice, Winn asserts that four pedagogical stances, History Matters; Race Matters; Justice Matters; and Language Matters are essential for learning communities to engage in their pursuit of justice. In this talk, Winn argues for a fifth pedagogical stances, Futures Matter, using Stetsenko's Transformative Activist Stance (TAS) framework.

March 27, 2019: Can We Wait 75 Years to Cut the Prison Population in Half?, University of Rochester
"End the era of mass incarceration" is an emerging consensus issue but what would it take to truly end mass incarceration? Looking at decarcerating trends in New York, New Jersey, and California, the Sentencing Project's Nazgol Ghandnoosh argues for a more robust approach than the ones presently on offer. Releasing "non-violent drug offenders" is a critical step, but if we are serious about ending mass incarceration, we need to meaningfully reform sentences for people convicted of violent crimes.

Spring 2019, CPEP Auburn Literary Journal Launch, Cornell University 
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Sound and Media (LLC10)

March 7, 2019, Mini-Seminar and Lecture, "Build: The Power of Hip Hop in a Divided World," Syracuse University 
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Spring 2019, Spring Planning Session, University of Rochester
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Perspectives on Europe from the Periphery (LLC11)

Spring 2019, Spring Research Workshop and Planning Meeting, Colgate University 
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LELACS (LLC12)

April 5, 2019: Spring Working Papers Colloquium, Colgate University 
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Spanish Poetics (LLC13)

April 9, 2019: Spring Symposium, Syracuse University 
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April 10, 2019: Spring Symposium, Le Moyne College
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Health Humanities: Medicine, Disease, Disability, and Culture (LLC22)

April 6, 2019: Organizing Meeting, Syracuse University 
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Social and Cultural Sustainability in South Asia (LLC23)

April 5, 2019: Spring Planning Retreat, Syracuse University 
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Small Press Reading Series (LLC24)

April 16, 2019: Small Press Reading Series, Colgate University 
The next Small Press Reading Series will feature authors Shira Dentz (Sisyphusina, PANK Books 2020), Aimee Harrison (editor at Essay Press), Micah Dean Hicks (Break the Bodies, Haunt the Bones, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2019), and Adam Tedesco (Mary Oliver, Lithic Press 2019).

Gender and Class in the Novel (LLC25)

Spring 2019, Spring Meeting #1, Cornell University 
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Spring 2019, Spring Workshop #2, Hamilton College 
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Composition, Labor, and Embodiment (LLC26)

February 27, 2019, Spring Symposium with Deborah Mutnick, Syracuse University 
In "Rethinking Pathways to Freedom in an Era of Economic Austerity," Dr. Deborah Mutnick will describe how a community-based course she developed used library, archival, and digital literacies to deepen students' understanding of academic research and writing was complicated by the troubled socio-economic context of Long Island University Brooklyn, which has seen the imposition of a strict austerity regime and a contentious labor struggle in recent years.

This new cluster supports historical inquiry across the humanities, fostering research within history as a discipline and across disciplinary contexts. To cultivate mutual exchange and scholarly collaboration, the cluster welcomes scholars working within and across regional, cultural, and national boundaries, drawing on comparative, transnational, or global perspectives, and those working in historical studies using interdisciplinary and/or thematic approaches.

Scientific Norms and the Concept of the Normal (HS1)

Spring 2019, Spring Workshop, Cornell University
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Slow Historical Studies (HS2)

March 23, 2019: Slow Historical Studies Meeting #3, Colgate University
This is a three-part series of workshops centered on the theme of "Slow Archaeology." Our long-term goal is to create community and draw together isolated historical studies scholars in the CNY region. For this workshop, we will continue our discussions on the theoretical, practical, and ethical implications of a "slow archaeology." More specifically, we will focus on workshopping drafts of conference papers and exhibit seminars ahead of the TAG conference and developing publication plans, SAR seminar proposals, and/or NEH collaborations moving forward.

Urban Humanities (HS3)

March 21, 2019: A Roundtable on Architectural Historiography, University of Rochester
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Late Antiquity (HS4)

January 25, 2019: Book Discussion, Syracuse University
As part of our year's engagement of the conversation between ecological thought and the study of late ancient Christianity, we will discuss Virginia Burrus's recent book, Ancient Christian Ecopoetics: Cosmologies, Saints, Things (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018).
April 6, 2019: Symposium "Trees and More: Ecological Thinking and the Ancient Christian Imagination," Syracuse University
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This cluster aims to supplement archival research in any of the other cluster areas and to support research in new media as well as issues of preservation and exchange of historical media archives.

For Spring 2019, there are no active Archives and Media working groups.

The Distinguished Visiting Collaborator program further enhances liberal arts education in the region by bringing prominent external scholars from various fields in the humanities for brief residencies during which they give public lectures, lead small seminars and symposia, and meet with students.

Mellon Collaborator (MC1)

February 5, 2019: Seminar with Jeffrey T. Nealon, Syracuse University 
Jeffrey T. Nealon, Edwin Erle Sparks Professor English and Philosophy, Penn State University, will conduct a visiting seminar on the ethical philosophies of Jacques Derrida and Emmanuel Levinas in Professor Gregg Lambert's philosophy course on Critique of European Humanism.