Working Groups & Organizers

Lead Organizers are marked with an asterisk (*).

 

Archives and Media

This cluster aims to supplement archival research in any of the other cluster areas (e.g., Visual Arts and Culture, Musicology/Performance Studies), and to support research in new media as well as issues of preservation and exchange of historical media archives.

 

Media and the Premodern (AM6)

We are a group of scholars interested in the relationship between Media Theory and History (as broadly conceived) and premodern cultures, especially those of Classical Antiquity, Byzantium and the Medieval World. Although Media Theory has often looked to Ancient Greek culture (particularly its models of orality and literacy, the development of writing and notation systems, and the notion of the “medium”), Media Studies is more conventionally associated with the print and digital cultures of (post)modernity. We believe that not only do ancient models of media have much to offer the history of media (including the unsettling of modern assumptions), but also that Media Studies also has much to offer the disciplines of Classics, Medieval Studies, and other disciplines focusing on premodern cultures.

Glenn Peers, Professor of Art History, Syracuse University
*Verity Platt, Professor of Classics, Cornell University

 

Digital Humanities

Each of the Corridor’s founding institutions sponsor events in the digital humanities within their respective humanities programs. The CNY Humanities Corridor also nurtures working groups of local faculty with planning grants in this research cluster.

 

Global Digital Humanities (DH3)

Jay Bloom, Visiting Associate Professor of Art History, Hamilton College
Chris Hanson,
Associate Professor of English, Syracuse University
June Hwang
, Associate Professor of German, University of Rochester
Kyoko Omori, Associate Professor, Japanese, Hamilton College
Janet Oppedisano, Director, Digital Humanities Initiative, Hamilton College
Leah Shafer, Associate Professor, Media and Society, Hobart and William Smith Colleges
Patrick Williams, Librarian for Literature, Rhetoric, and Digital Humanities, Syracuse University
*Iskandar Zulkarnain, Visiting Assistant Professor of Media and Society, Hobart and William Smith Colleges

 

Digital Humanities Speaker Series (DH8)

Paul Fleming, Director, Society for the Humanities; Professor of Comparative Literature and German Studies, Cornell University
Vivian M. May, Principal Investigator, CNY Humanities Corridor; Director, Syracuse University Humanities Center; Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies, Syracuse University
Joan S. Rubin, Director of the Humanities Center, Dexter Perkins Professor in History, University of Rochester

 

AI and Human Values (DH11)

This working group is an effort to build a long-term interdisciplinary research collaboration that will examine the philosophical, social, and normative aspects of artificial intelligence (AI).

*Jonathan Herington, Lecturer in Philosophy, University of Rochester
Johannes Himmelreich, Assistant Professor of Public Administration and International Affairs, Syracuse University
Jens Kipper, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, University of Rochester

 

Data in the Humanities (DH12)

Viewed through the lens of the digital humanities, data is a form of evidence that is open to analysis, argument, visualization, computation, and critical engagement. This working group brings together scholars across the wider humanities spectrum to engage and discuss the tools, pedagogy, and specific technical and methodological challenges related to data in the humanities.

Eliza Bettinger, Digital Humanities Librarian, Cornell University
Josh Finnell, Associate Professor in the University Libraries, Colgate University
*Emily Sherwood, Director of the Digital Scholarship Lab, University of Rochester
Patrick Williams, Librarian for Literature, Rhetoric, and Digital Humanities, Syracuse University

 

 

Historical Studies

This new cluster supports historical inquiry across the humanities, fostering research within history as a discipline and across disciplinary contexts. To cultivate mutual exchange and scholarly collaboration, the cluster welcomes scholars working within and across regional, cultural, and national boundaries, drawing on comparative, transnational, or global perspectives, and those working in historical studies using interdisciplinary and/or thematic approaches.

 

Scientific Norms and the Concept of the Normal (HS1)

This group proposes to bring together scholars working in animal studies, environmental history/eco-criticism, history of medicine, cognitive studies, gender studies, critical race studies, ability/disability studies, etc., to posit our fields and objects of study as fields/objects defined through and against scientific and disciplinary norms. We hope to hold workshops and public lectures to advance the projects of faculty and graduate students in these fields, as well as to build some collaborative projects (larger conferences and book projects).

*Kathleen Long, Professor of French, Cornell University
Stephanie Shirilan, Associate Professor, English, Syracuse University

 

Urban Humanities (HS3)

This working group brings together historians of architecture and urban development with scholars in adjacent disciplines to explore the historical ways that architecture and the urban built environment have operated in modern political life.

*Lawrence Chua, Assistant Professor, Architecture, Syracuse University
Peter Christensen, Associate Professor of Art History, University of Rochester
Samia Henni, Assistant Professor of Architecture, Cornell University
Lisa Trivedi, Professor of History, Hamilton College

 

Late Antiquity (HS4)

*Virginia Burrus, Professor of Religion, Syracuse University
Georgia Frank
, Professor of Religion, Colgate University
Jennifer Glancy, Professor, Religious Studies, LeMoyne College
Kim Haines-Eitzen, Professor of World Religions, Cornell University

 

Environmental Humanities (HS5)

The environmental humanities is an umbrella term for humanistic approaches to environmental questions employing perspectives from history, philosophy, religious studies, cultural-historical geography, English and textual studies, science and technology studies, and the creative arts (visual, fiction, creative non-fiction). The field attempts to place the various “green” approaches from these disciplines into greater conversation with one another.

Sara Pritchard, Associate Professor, Science & Technology Studies, Cornell University
Aaron Sachs, Professor of History, Cornell University
*Robert Wilson,
 Associate Professor of Geography, Syracuse University

 

History and Technology of the Book (HS6)

We envision a group that explores the book as a physical object, making use of long-established disciplines (such as paleography and codicology) and new technologies, such as multispectral imaging. Our group activities will draw upon the expertise of faculty, curators, librarians, and graduate students across the Humanities Corridor institutions through a series of workshops, reading groups, and multi-day conferences exploring the historical, material, and theoretical issues raised by the book-as-object. Future workshops will include paleography, codicology, the art of the book, and book imaging technologies. Conference possibilities include meetings on the history of paper, the history of inks, and book binding.

Gregory Heyworth, Associate Professor of English and Textual Science, University of Rochester
David Powers
, Professor, Near Eastern Studies, Cornell University
*Anna Siebach-Larsen, Librarian for Medieval Studies, University of Rochester

 

Apostolic Legends: Imagining Early Christianity from the Local to the Global (HS7)

This group seeks to bring together scholars who work on various aspects of Christian apostolic legends and their role in shaping the political, religious, and geographic imagination of various communities in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. 

*John Eldevik, Associate Professor of History, Hamilton College
Georgia Frank
, Professor of Religion, Colgate University
Samantha Kahn Herrick, Associate Professor of History, Syracuse University

 

Mediterranean Seminar (HS8)

For scholars of emotions, the Mediterranean offers an opportunity to consider how emotions were means to establish, to ascertain, and to communicate identity. Mediterranean studies presents an ideal geography and framework for considering the larger issues discussed in the history of emotions: their universality, relativity, purpose, their place in power structures, their differences depending on race, ethnicity, gender, and their significance and understanding (or lack thereof of) in interfaith and inter-cultural relations.

*Thomas Devaney, Associate Professor of History, University of Rochester
Ana Méndez-Oliver
, Assistant Professor of Spanish, Hispanic Literatures and Cultures, Syracuse University

 

HIV/AIDS Activism and Public Health (HS9)

We plan to run a work-in-progress workshop for faculty researching histories of HIV/AIDS and public health. We also plan to have a planning meeting in advance of the workshop to organize a conference on HIV/AIDS for Spring 2021.

Tamar Carroll, Associate Professor History, Rochester Institute of Technology
*Stephen Vider
, Assistant Professor of History, Cornell University

 

Humanities Futures

This cluster is aimed at field-building in the humanities, diversity, pipelines, pedagogies and methods, futures, interdisciplinary fields, and also topical/timely themes in the humanities (health, rural, environmental). Those scholars interested in rethinking doctoral education and graduate programs, graduate studies, public humanities, and/or pedagogies and methods may find a fit within this cluster.

 

Humanities Research Administrators (HF1)

This working group aims to support and strengthen Humanities research across the corridor by sharing resources and developing best practices for research administration. 

Debra Haring, Assistant Dean for Grants and Contracts, University of Rochester
Carmel Lurito Lee, Associate Director of Research Development, Cornell University
*Sarah Workman, Assistant Director of Proposal Development in the Humanities, Syracuse University

 

 

Linguistics

Well-established before the CNY Humanities Corridor began, collaboration among Linguistics faculty has increased, strengthening their ties across campuses and developing new working groups. They have gathered semi-annually in workshops and were the first cluster to establish programming around a distinguished research collaborator.

 

Workshop on the Syntax-Semantics Interface (LIN4)

*Jaklin Kornfilt, Professor, Linguistics, Syracuse University
Jeffrey T. Runner, Professor of Linguistics and Brain & Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester
John Whitman, Professor, Linguistics, Cornell University

 

Interdisciplinary Approach to Discourse (LIN6)

Luvell Anderson, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Syracuse University
Janice Dowell
, Professor of Philosophy, Syracuse University
*Sarah Murray
, Associate Professor of Linguistics, Cornell University
William Starr
, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Cornell University

 

Language Documentation in Multilingual Communities (LIN9)

This working group brings together scholars in linguistics who work on documentation of indigenous, minority, and refugee languages including aspects of linguistic structure and socio-linguistic dimensions.

*Maya Abtahian, Assistant Professor, Linguistics, University of Rochester
Abigail Cohn, Professor of Linguistics, Cornell University
Rania Habib, Associate Professor of Linguistics and Arabic, Syracuse University

 

Language Sound Structures (LIN10)

This group will explore common themes and areas of interest centered around the documentation and analysis of phonetic and phonological patterns in human language. We will focus on the methodologies for linguistic analysis, theory, experimental work in the lab and in the field, building corpus and corpus analysis, as well as newly developing methods and technologies applicable to the investigation of human speech sounds.

*Abigail Cohn, Professor of Linguistics, Cornell University
Christopher Green, Assistant Professor of Linguistics, Syracuse University
Joyce McDonough, Professor of Linguistics, University of Rochester

 

New Directions in Semantics and Pragmatics (LIN11)

The working group consists of faculty in linguistics semantics and philosophy of language. It aims to provide a venue for exchanging ideas about research in progress in a series of workshops, focusing on new models for semantics and pragmatics.

Ash Asudeh, Professor of Linguistics, University of Rochester
Arc Kocurek, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Cornell University
*Mats Rooth, Professor of Linguistics, Cornell University

 

 

Literature, Language, and Culture

This cluster was proposed on the basis of shared strengths and faculty resources in languages and literatures across the Corridor, including faculty from regional liberal arts colleges and universities. Existing working groups in this cluster include those collaborating on Victorian, 18th Century, and Early Modern periods. Other working groups include those working within ethnic studies and international literature.

 

Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures (LLC5)

Patrick Berry, Associate Professor, Writing and Rhetoric, Syracuse University
Joel Burges, Associate Professor of English, University of Rochester
Kristin Doughty, Associate Professor, Anthropology, University of Rochester
*Joshua Dubler, Assistant Professor, Religion, University of Rochester
Evelyne Leblanc-Roberge, Associate Professor of Art & Lens Based Media, University of Rochester
Alison Peterman, Associate Professor of Philosophy, University of Rochester
Robert Scott, Executive Director, Cornell Prison Education Program (CPEP)

 

Critical Theory and the Global: The Politics of Translation (LLC9)

William Bridges, Assistant Professor of Japanese, University of Rochester
Andrew Campana, Assistant Professor, Asian Studies, Cornell University
*Brett de Bary, Professor, Asian Studies, Cornell University
Naoki Sakai, Goldwin Smith Professor of Asian Studies, Cornell University

 

Sound and Media (LLC10)

*Sarah Fuchs, Assistant Professor, Music History and Cultures, Syracuse University
Darren Mueller, Assistant Professor, Musicology, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester

 

Perspectives on Europe from the Periphery (LLC11)

Kathryn Everly, Professor, Spanish Literature and Culture, Syracuse University
Monica Facchini, Associate Professor, Italian, Colgate University
Stefano Giannini, Chair and Associate Professor, Italian, Syracuse University
Patrizia McBride, Professor, German Studies, Cornell University
*Karina von Tippelskirch, Associate Professor, German, Syracuse University

LELACS (Lake Erie Latin American Cultural Studies) (LLC12)

Anindita Banerjee, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature, Cornell University
*Gail Bulman, Associate Professor, Spanish, Syracuse University
Debra Castillo, Emerson Hinchliff Chair of Hispanic Studies and Professor of Comparative Literature, Cornell University
May Farnsworth, Associate Professor of Spanish and Hispanic Studies, Hobart and William Smith Colleges
Beth Jörgensen, Professor Emerita of Spanish, University of Rochester
Óscar Pérez, Assistant Professor of Spanish, Skidmore College
Fernando Rodriguez-Mansilla, Associate Professor of Spanish and Hispanic Studies, Hobart and William Smith Colleges

 

Spanish Poetics (LLC13)

We focus on the critical analysis of contemporary literature and film written in Spanish. We have published in various venues on topics ranging from the influence of classical mythology in modern poetry by women to poetry as historical document.

*Kathryn Everly, Professor, Spanish Literature and Culture, Syracuse University
Josefa Alvarez, Associate Professor, Foreign Languages, Le Moyne College

 

Jewish Studies (LLC17)

*Jonathan Boyarin, Professor of Modern Jewish Studies, Cornell University
Zachary Braiterman, Professor of Religion, Syracuse University
Elissa Sampson, Lecturer in Jewish Studies, Cornell University
Harvey Teres, Professor of English, Syracuse University

 

Gender and Sexuality Writing Collective (LLC21)

*Tanya Bakhmetyeva, Associate Professor of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies, University of Rochester
Rebecca Burditt, Assistant Professor of Media and Society, Hobart and William Smith Colleges

 

Health Humanities: Medicine, Disease, Disability, and Culture (LLC22)

This working group brings together scholars across the region who are exploring the intersections among health and culture through the lens of humanities and social science disciplines.

*Lois Agnew, Professor of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition, Syracuse University
Stacey Langwick, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Cornell University
Andrew London
, Professor of Sociology, Syracuse University

 

Social and Cultural Sustainability in South Asia (LLC23)

We are focused specifically on one of the four “pillars” of sustainability — socio-cultural sustainability — which typically receives far less attention and import than the other three pillars (political, environmental, and economic). Cultural sustainability concerns issues of both change and preservation and engages debates about cultural heritage.

*Carol Babiracki, Associate Professor of Music History & Cultures, Syracuse University
Iftikhar Dadi, Associate Professor, History of Art & Visual Studies, Cornell University
Karim-Aly Kassam, International Professor of Environmental and Indigenous Studies, Cornell University

 

Small Press Reading Series (LLC24)

*Jesi Buell, Associate Professor in the University Libraries, Colgate University
Patrick Williams, Librarian for Literature, Rhetoric, and Digital Humanities, Syracuse University

 

Gender and Class in the Novel (LLC25)

The proposed group brings together faculty and graduate students who are working on the (largely European) novel from the 18th to the 21st century. The groups is intended to be read and discuss ongoing work-in-progress on the novel as an archive for addressing questions of class and gender across national and epochal boundaries.

*Paul Fleming, Director of the Society for the Humanities; Professor of Comparative Literature and German Studies, Cornell University
Franziska Schweiger, Visiting Assistant Professor of German, Hamilton College

 

Composition, Labor, and Embodiment (LLC26)

This group focuses on writing education, labor & embodiment in an era of economic austerity, retrenchment & transnationalization in higher education.

Patrick Berry, Associate Professor of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition, Syracuse University
Michelle Cox, Senior Lecturer and Director of English Language Support Office, Cornell University
David Martins, University Writing Program Director, Rochester Institute of Technology
Kate Navickas, Director of the Writing Walk-In Service, Cornell University
Deborah Rossen-Knill, Professor of Writing, Speaking, and Argument, University of Rochester
Jessica Sands, Senior Lecturer and Multilingual Writing Specialist, Cornell University
*Tony Scott, Associate Professor of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition, Syracuse University

 

Community-Engaged Public Humanities (LLC27)

This group focuses on community-engaged approaches to humanities (broadly conceived) research and teaching. By community-engaged we mean projects undertaken collaboratively that value multiple perspectives and voices, contribute to creating and sustaining communities of place, interest, and identity; build collective capacity for action; and work towards social change. The group seeks to foster a set of conversations that take community-engaged, public humanities research and teaching as a starting point for pursuing shared methodological and pedagogical questions.

Nicole Fonger, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Syracuse University
Timur Hammond, Assistant Professor of Geography, Syracuse University
Kathryn Mariner, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Visual and Cultural Studies, University of Rochester
*Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition, Syracuse University

 

Re-Imagining the Discipline: German Studies, the Humanities, and the University (LLC28)

The proposed working group will examine the disciplinary and institutional contexts that make up Anglo-American German Studies in our day. The field has since the 1970s developed a unique profile as an umbrella term for interdisciplinary endeavors that have driven critical conversations informed by the German intellectual tradition, helping frame momentous trends that in the last decades have reshaped humanities studies and the institution of the university in North America. This historical trajectory makes German Studies an optimal lens for appraising the state of the humanities in the current landscape of higher-education, as they meet the challenges and seize the opportunities created by profound changes in the structure and funding of the university; the technological and institutional developments that have reshaped the ways we teach and conduct research; the diversification and stratification of our student population; and the shrinking support for public education displayed by politicians and the public at large.

Paul Fleming, Professor of German Studies, Cornell University
*Patrizia C. McBride, Professor of German Studies, Cornell University
Matthew Miller, Associate Professor of German, Colgate University
Karina von Tippelskirch, Associate Professor of German, Syracuse University

 

Bringing Latin to Life: Transforming Latin Pedagogy for Maximal Inclusion and Impact (LLC29)

This working group ‘Bringing Latin to Life’ aims at exchanging ideas of teaching practices geared toward Latin as the target language, sharing best practices and most recent theoretical insights in language acquisition.

Michael Fontaine, Professor of Classics, Cornell University
*Matthieu van der Meer, Assistant Professor of Classics, Syracuse University

 

Culture and Democracy in 19th-Century New York (LLC30)

This new group will be faculty members who work on 19th century U. S. literature in the context of interdisciplinary attention to science, race, and democracy. 

Dorri Beam, Associate Professor of English, Syracuse University
*Shirley Samuels, Professor of English, Cornell University
Ezra Tawil, Professor of English, University of Rochester

 

Rethinking Imperial Assemblages (LLC31)

This working group focuses on feminist/ queer critical analytics that interrogate structures, logics, and manifestations of empire, militarization, neoliberalism, ethnonationalism, and settler colonialism in transnational and relational frameworks.

Chris Eng, Assistant Professor of English, Syracuse University
Carol Fadda, Associate Professor of English, Syracuse University
Aniruddha Maitra, Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies, Colgate University
Dana Olwan, Assistant Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies, Syracuse University
Nimanthi Rijasingham, Assistant Professor of English, Colgate University
Parisa Vaziri, Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature & Near Eastern Studies, Cornell University

 

Hemispheric Indigenous Studies (LLC32)

We will examine the common challenges and opportunities facing Indigenous peoples of North and South America, exploring ways to create hemispheric dialogs focused on activism and mutual goals, while acknowledging our historic cultural differences.

Scott Manning Stevens, Associate Professor of Native American and Indigenous Studies and English, Syracuse University
Brianna Theobald, Assistant Professor of History, University of Rochester

 

Religion and Morality in China (LLC33)

Our working group examines how the revival of religion in contemporary China is engendering broader transformations in morality in Chinese society such as increasing involvement in charity, philanthropy, and environmentalism.

Gareth Fisher, Associate Professor of Religion, Syracuse University
John Osburg, Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Rochester

 

 

Musicology/Performance Studies

In an area full of very active performers, musicologists, and ethnomusicologists this cluster of Corridor funding has encouraged collaborative research and performance. The faculty members of the Musicology/Performance Studies cluster have exchanged teaching and conducting podia; brought world-class musicians to play side by side with their graduate students, who composed the works being played; have invited pre-eminent performance studies scholars to conduct mini-seminars; and have collaboratively staged works from the distant past, engaging in vibrant practice-based research. Film music scholars have held symposia and Syracuse University’s Bird Library archivist brought together artists, lawyers and producers to discuss copyright law and musicians.

 

Teaching Exchange (MMH17)

Amanda Eubanks Winkler, Associate Professor, Music History and Cultures, Syracuse University
*Roger Moseley, Associate Professor, Music, Cornell University
Holly Watkins, Associate Professor, Musicology, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester

 

Improvisation in Theory and Practice (MMH18)

Anne Laver, Assistant Professor and University Organist, Music, Syracuse University
*Roger Moseley, Associate Professor, Music, Cornell University

 

Performance/History (MMH22)

*Christian DuComb, Associate Professor, Theater, Colgate University
Cory Hunter, Assistant Professor of Music and Musicology, University of Rochester
Anne Laver, Assistant Professor and University Organist, Music, Syracuse University
Honey Meconi, Professor of Musicology, University of Rochester
Mary Simonson, Associate Professor of Film & Media Studies and Women’s Studies, Colgate University
Byron Suber, Senior Lecturer, Performing & Media Arts, Cornell University
Amanda Eubanks Winkler, Associate Professor, Music History and Cultures, Syracuse University

 

South Asian Media and Performance Cultures (MP1)

This working group bring together scholars of South Asian music, cinema, and new media. As scholars working on this important area of global culture and the radical changes taking place therein, we will collaborate with the George Eastman Museum to utilize their newly acquired collection of contemporary Indian cinema–the largest such collection in the world–for pedagogical and research purposes.

*Anaar Desai-Stephens, Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology, University of Rochester
Pavitra Sundar, Assistant Professor of Literature, Hamilton College

 

Cultural Competencies in Arts Performance and Research (MP2)

As educators and artists we recognize an evolving need to develop cultural competencies that create inclusive spaces for our students and audiences. This newly established working group will provide an ongoing platform for the development of these competencies.

Tamara Acosta, Music, Cornell University
*Stephen Spinelli, Lecturer and Assistant Director of Choral Programs, Cornell University
Katherine Walker, Associate Professor of Music, Hobart and William Smith Colleges
Michael Woods, Professor of Music, Hamilton College

 

Music Theory Examples by Women (MP3)

We seek to explore and extend the presence of female composers in music theory curricula and to support and engage other scholars and student working in this area.

*Mark Gotham, Active Learning Initiative Postdoctoral Associate in Computational Music Theory Pedagogy, Cornell University
Betsy West Marvin, Professor of Music Theory, University of Rochester

 

Practice-Based Performance Studies (MP4)

This group aims to support exchange and collaboration between scholars and artists in the CNY Corridor region who are interested in the ways that performance practice enhances and may be enhanced by scholarly methodologies.

Anna Rosensweig, Assistant Professor of French, University of Rochester
*Stephanie Shirilan, Associate Professor of English, Syracuse University

 

Historical Keyboarding (MP5)

Drawing on the holdings of Corridor institutions, this working group will explore the cultural, political, and aesthetic potential of keyboard instruments ranging from the clavichord and organ to the carillon and the Moog synthesizer. 

Xak Bjerken, Professor of Music, Cornell University
Anne Laver, Assistant Professor and University Organist, Music, Syracuse University
*Roger Moseley, Associate Professor of Music, Cornell University
Annette Richards, Professor in the Humanities and University Organist, Cornell University

 

Philosophy/Critical Theory

This cluster is well-established across the Corridor, with regard to Philosophy as a discipline, and open to cross-disciplinary work in philosophical studies and critical theory more broadly. To foster mutual interchange, communication, and scholarly collaboration, its working groups hold workshops and small symposia to host visiting speakers, present works in progress, support reading groups, and hold joint seminars. For instance, one group sponsors a summer conference around a theme. Another group used funds to design a website so members could keep in touch. A third group conducted a graduate class, engaging graduate students and faculty from all three Corridor universities.

 

Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy/ Creighton Club (PCT1)

*Mark Heller, Professor of Philosophy, Syracuse University
Michael Rieppel, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Syracuse University
David Sobel, Professor of Ethics and Political Philosophy, Syracuse University

 

Continental Philosophy (PCT6)

*Paul Fleming, Director of the Society for the Humanities; Professor of Comparative Literature and German Studies, Cornell University
Gregg Lambert, Dean’s Professor of the Humanities, Syracuse University

 

Ancient Philosophy (PCT7)

Tad Brennan, Professor, Classics, Cornell University
Jacob Klein, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Colgate University
Deborah Modrak, Professor, Philosophy, University of Rochester
Christopher Noble, Assistant Professor, Philosophy, Syracuse University
*Krisanna Scheiter, Associate Professor, Philosophy, Union College

 

Theorizing Italy (PCT11)

This group focuses on Italian philosophical thought across historical periods. It attempts to bring together faculty and graduate students across the humanities corridor to discuss and think about the most important questions concerning Italian philosophy. Events will likely include invited lectures and workshops.

*Silvia Benso, Professor, Philosophy, Rochester Institute of Technology
Timothy Campbell, Professor of Italian Studies, Cornell University
Stefano Giannini, Associate Professor of Italian, Syracuse University
Brian Schroeder, Professor, Philosophy, Rochester Institute of Technology
Donatella Stocchi-Perucchio, Associate Professor of Italian, University of Rochester

 

Moral Psychology (PCT12)

Moral psychology is philosophical theorizing about mental states, activities, processes, and attitudes insofar as they bear on living a good or moral life. Topics include the nature of specific mental states and emotions (sympathy, regret, conscience, or anger) and their relations, debates about moral motivation and responsibility, and the analysis of particular virtues and vices (such as generosity, cruelty, or justice), among others. This working group seeks to broaden awareness that moral psychology constitutes a coherent and significant category for philosophical reflection. The group will host events and workshops to promote research that is relevant to this ancient philosophical project. In so doing, it aims to re-invigorate interest in CNY in the sort of discussions Socrates described in the Apology as “the greatest good.”

Kenneth Baynes, Professor, Philosophy, Syracuse University
Marianna Bergamaschi Ganapini, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Union College
*John Monteleone, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Le Moyne College

 

Central New York Religious Studies Consortium (PCT13)

To explore and pursue possibilities for collaboration in the interdisciplinary study of religion among regional faculty and graduate students.

*Philip Arnold, Associate Professor of Religion, Syracuse University
Jonathan Boyarin, Professor of Modern Jewish Studies, Cornell University
Virginia Burrus, Professor of Religion, Syracuse University
Aaron Hughes, Professor of Jewish Studies, University of Rochester
Jenna Reinbold, Associate Professor of Religion, Colgate University

 

Athena in Action New York (PCT15)

Collaboration to support women graduate students in the major upstate New York universities with Philosophy PhD programs.

Janice Dowell, Professor, Philosophy, Syracuse University
*Rachana Kamtekar, Professor, Philosophy, Cornell University
Alison Peterman, Associate Professor, Philosophy, University of Rochester

 

Visual Arts and Culture

The Visual Arts and Culture working groups have attracted faculty from various departments and disciplines in the Corridor across the fields of Visual Studies and Art History. They have sponsored workshops, conferences, film and speaker tours, joint graduate seminars, art exhibitions, and visiting collaborations. The cluster also includes the public humanities and architecture working groups; another area of future expansion and new working groups are planned for faculty in Arts and Music Histories, and significant amount of reserve has been set aside for this purpose in the budget allocation for this cluster.

 

New Approaches to Scholarship and Pedagogy in Ottoman and Turkish Architecture (VAC1)

Ezra Akcan, Associate Professor, Architecture, Cornell University
*Peter Christensen, Associate Professor, Art History, University of Rochester

 

Visual Studies (VAC3)

Julie Grossman, Professor, Film Studies, Le Moyne College
Will Scheibel, Assistant Professor of English, Syracuse University

 

Modernist Geographies (VAC23)

This group will provide a forum for new research on patterns of exchange and influence in the visual arts of the 19th and 20th centuries that complicates or revises geographical categories (such as East/West, Europe/Americas, and Western/non-Western) that have organized art historical research. Our aim is to better define trans- or inter-cultural artistic practices and the conditions that have supported them, as well as their opposite: regionally specific and non-transferable arts that have resisted globalization. The group will facilitate scholarly exchange among faculty and expand informal advising networks for undergraduate and graduate students.

Laura Moure Cecchini, Assistant Professor of Art and Art History, Colgate University
Rachel Haidu, Associate Professor, Art History, University of Rochester
*Samuel Johnson, Assistant Professor of Art History, Syracuse University

Premodern Transmedia (VAC26)

This working group will consider the implications of the “material turn” for scholarship on the history of art in premodern Europe and Asia. Core participants include two art historians of pre-modern China (Hong and Liu), two historians of Byzantine art (Anderson and Hilsdale) and one early modern art historian (Heuer). All have strong records of publication on the topics of matter, material transfer, and remediation.

Benjamin Anderson, Associate Professor of History of Art and Classics, Cornell University
*Christopher Heuer, Associate Professor of Art History, University of Rochester
Lihong Liu, Assistant Professor of Art History, University of Rochester

Global Cinema (VAC27)

The Global Cinema Working Group will generate collaborative initiatives focused on scholarship and teaching in the fields of global and national cinemas.  

Rebecca Bruditt, Assistant Professor of Media and Society, Hobart and William Smith Colleges
*Lisa Patti, Associate Professor of Media and Society, Hobart and William Smith Colleges
Samantha Sheppard, Assistant Professor, Performing and Media Arts, Cornell University
Pavitra Sundar, Assistant Professor of Literature, Hamilton College

 

Feminist Praxis in Architecture and Design (VAC28)

Group’s primary purpose is to connect a cross-generational group of academics working at the nexus of intersectional feminism, architectural education, and design practice, to facilitate dialogue on plan future projects related to fostering change in the academy and profession. In addition to nurturing collaborations for future work, we will host Wikipedia-a-thons together to write more women, queers and people of color into the web and other public forums as a way of putting our theory into practice.

Lori Brown, Professor, Architecture, Syracuse University
Lily H. Chi, Associate Professor, Architecture, Cornell University
Samia Henni, Assistant Professor, Architecture, Cornell University
*Kirin Makker, Associate Professor of Art and Architecture, Hobart and William Smith Colleges

 

Emptiness (VAC29)

Azra Hromadzic, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Syracuse University
Mary Moran, Professor of Anthropology and Africana & Latin American Studies, Colgate University
*Deborah Pellow, Professor of Anthropology, Syracuse University
Guido Pezzarossi, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Syracuse University

 

(Post)Conflict Societies: Politics/Nature/Extraction (VAC30)

We propose to collaboratively explore the relationship between politics, nature, and extraction in numerous (post)conflict, postsocialist and settler colonial contexts. 

Azra Hromadzic, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Syracuse University
Kristin Doughty, Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Rochester
Mona Bhan, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Syracuse University

 

 

Inactive Working Groups

This list includes recent working groups that are not currently active for 2019-20.

 

Institutional Strategies for Engaging Digital Collections (AM1)

Matthew Warne, Instructor, Transmedia, Syracuse University
Patrick Williams, Librarian for Literature, Rhetoric, and Digital Humanities, Syracuse University
Andrew Saluti, Assistant Professor, Museum Studies, Syracuse University
Sarah Keen, University Archivist, Head of Special Collections and University Archives; Associate Professor in the University Libraries, Colgate University

 

Digital Data Visualization & Interpretation in the Public Humanities (DH1)

Anne E. Mosher, Associate Professor, Geography, Syracuse University
Jane M. Read, Associate Professor, Geography, Syracuse University
Chris Hanson, Assistant Professor, English, Syracuse University
Patrick Williams, Librarian for Literature, Rhetoric, and Digital Humanities, Syracuse University
Michael Jarvis, Associate Professor, History, University of Rochester

 

Digital Humanities Initiative (DH2)

Chris Forster, Assistant Professor, English, Syracuse University
Eliza Bettinger, Digital Humanities Librarian, Olin & Uris Libraries, Cornell University
Timothy Murray, Professor, Comparative Literature and English, Cornell University

 

Digital Humanities in Practice (DH9)

*Sarah Fuchs Sampson, Assistant Professor of Music History and Cultures, Syracuse University
Darren Mueller, Assistant Professor of Musicology, University of Rochester

 

Reconstruction, Structural Analysis, and Conservation of Ancient Monuments in Coastal Ghana (DH10)

*Christopher DeCorse, Professor, Anthropology, Syracuse University
Renato Perucchio, Program Director, Archaeology, Technology, and Historical Structures, University of Rochester

 

Slow Historical Studies (HS2)

*Guido Pezzarossi, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Syracuse University
Matthew Velasco, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Cornell University
Kristin De Lucia, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Colgate University

 

The Multilingual Mind (LIN5)

Tej Bhatia, Professor, Linguistics and Hindi, Syracuse University
Maya Ravindranath Abtahian, Assistant Professor, Linguistics, University of Rochester

 

Interdisciplinary Approaches to Linguistics (LIN6)

Sarah Murray, Associate Professor, Linguistics, Cornell University
William Starr, Associate Professor, Philosophy, Cornell University
Brett Sherman, formerly of the University of Rochester

 

The Future(s) of Microhistory (LLC1)

Thomas Devaney, Associate Professor, History, University of Rochester
Claudia Verhoeven, Associate Professor, History, Cornell University

 

The Chinese Quest for Modernity: From the Religious Perspective (LLC2)

Shin-yi Chao, Associate Professor, Religion, University of Rochester
Gareth Fisher, Associate Professor, Religion, Syracuse University
Elya Zhang, Assistant Professor, History, University of Rochester

 

Early Modern Thinking (LLC3)

Rayna Kalas, Associate Professor, English, Cornell University
Crystal Bartolovich, Associate Professor, English, Syracuse University

 

Decolonial Feminisms (LLC4)

Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Professor, Sociology and the Cultural Foundations of Education & Dean’s Professor of the Humanities, Women’s and Gender Studies, Syracuse University
Myrna García Calderón, Associate Professor, Spanish, Syracuse University
Pedro DiPietro, Assistant Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies, Syracuse University
Sofía Villenas, Associate Professor, Anthropology, Cornell University
Cristina Serna, Assistant Professor, Women’s Studies, Colgate University

 

Nineteenth Century Studies (LLC6)

Coran Klaver, Associate Professor, English, Syracuse University
Elisha Cohn, Associate Professor, English, Cornell University

 

Inclusion and Exclusion in the Modern Middle East (LLC7)

Amy Kallander, Associate Professor, History, Syracuse University
Ziad Fahmy, Associate Professor, Near Eastern Studies, Cornell University

 

Religion and Literature (LLC8)

William Robert, Associate Professor, Religion, Syracuse University
Steven Yao, Professor of Literature, Hamilton College

 

Facismo (LLC15)

Matthew BaileyShea, Associate Professor of Music Theory, University of Rochester
Donatella Stocchi-Perucchio, Associate Professor of Italian, University of Rochester

 

CNY Poets and Writers (LLC16)

Dana Spiotta, Associate Professor, English, Syracuse University
J. Robert Lennon, Professor, English, Cornell University

 

Networking Iroquoia (LLC19)

Scott Manning Stevens, Associate Professor, Native American and Indigenous Studies and English, Syracuse University
Jolene Rickard, Associate Professor, History of Art & Visual Studies, Cornell University

 

LALAAB: Latin American Literature and Arts Across Borders (LLC20)

*Gail Bulman, Associate Professor of Spanish, Syracuse University
May Farnsworth, Associate Professor of Spanish and Hispanic Studies, Hobart and William Smith Colleges

 

Mobilizing Music (MMH21)

Sydney Hutchinson, Associate Professor, Music History and Cultures, Syracuse University
Jennifer Kyker, Associate Professor, Musicology, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester
Alejandro Madrid, Professor, Music, Cornell University

 

Re-Sounding History (MMH24)

Sydney Hutchinson, Associate Professor of Music History and Cultures, Syracuse University
Lydia Hamessley, Professor, Music, Hamilton College
Deborah Justice, Instructor of Music Education, Syracuse University
Monica Facchini, Assistant Professor of Italian, Colgate University

 

History of Music Theory (MMH25)

Andrew Hicks, Associate Professor, Music, Cornell University
Holly Watkins, Chair and Associate Professor, Musicology, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester
Elizabeth West Marvin, Chair and Professor, Music Theory, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester
Roger Moseley, Associate Professor, Music, Cornell University
Roger Freitas, Associate Professor, Musicology, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester
Annette Richards, Professor and University Organist, Music, Cornell University
Edoardo Bellotti, Associate Professor, Organ, Harpsichord and Improvisation, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester

 

UNYWEMP: Upstate NY Workshop in Early Modern Philosophy (PCT3)

Kara Richardson, Associate Professor, Philosophy, Syracuse University
Andrew Chignell, Visiting Associate Professor, Philosophy, Cornell University
Alison Peterman, James P. Wilmot Distinguished Assistant Professor of Philosophy, University of Rochester
Marie Jayasekera, formerly of Colgate University

 

Political Theology (PCT5)

Bradley Onishi, Assistant Professor, Religious Studies, Skidmore College
Gregg Lambert, PI of the CNY Humanities Corridor; Dean’s Professor of the Humanities, Syracuse University

 

Ethics Reading Group (PCT9)

Hille Paakkunainen, Assistant Professor, Philosophy, Syracuse University
Kate Manne, Assistant Professor, Philosophy, Cornell University
William FitzPatrick, Gideon Webster Burbank Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy, University of Rochester

 

Objects of Inquiry: Re/Orienting LGBT/Queer Studies Introductory Courses (PCT14)

*Margaret Himley, Professor of Writing Studies; Director of LGBT Studies, Syracuse University
Melissa Autumn White, Assistant Professor of LGBT Studies, Hobart and William Smith Colleges

 

Critical Asian Cinematic Spaces (VAC2)

Lawrence Chua, Assistant Professor, Architecture, Syracuse University
Arnika Fuhrmann, Assistant Professor, Asian Studies, Cornell University
Zhuoyi Wang, Associate Professor, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Hamilton College

 

nMap: New Media Art Practice (VAC4)

Wenhua Shi, formerly of Colgate University
Rebecca Ruige Xu, Associate Professor of Computer Art and Animation, Syracuse University

 

Asian Humanities in Global Context (VAC19)

*Brian Hurley, Assistant Professor of Japanese Literature, Film, and Culture, Syracuse University
Pedro Erber, Associate Professor of Luso-Brazilian Studies, Cornell University

 

Connecting Art Histories Across the Americas (VAC20)

*Ananda Cohen-Aponte, Associate Professor of History of Art, Cornell University
Ella Maria Diaz, Assistant Professor of English and Latino/a Studies, Cornell University
Kristi Peterson, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History, Skidmore College

 

Crossing Cultures through Film (VAC21)

*Richard Buttny, Professor, Communication and Rhetorical Studies, 
Syracuse University
Connie Yuan, Professor, Communication, Cornell University
Jodi R. Cohen, Senior Lecturer, Communication, Cornell University

 

Mediterranean Music and Performance (VAC22)

*Edward Ruchalski, Director of Music, Professor of Practice, Le Moyne College
Josefa Alvarez, Associate Professor, Foreign Languages, Le Moyne College
Kathryn Everly, Professor, Spanish Literature and Culture, Syracuse University

 

New Readings: Bodies in Latin American Visual Arts and Culture (VAC24)

Debra Castillo, Emerson Hinchliff Chair of Hispanic Studies and Professor of Comparative Literature, Cornell University
Beth Jörgensen, Professor of Spanish, University of Rochester
*Gail Bulman, Associate Professor, Spanish, Syracuse University

 

War, Terror, and Genocide (VAC25)

Horace Campbell, Professor of Political Science and African American Studies, Syracuse University
Rachel McGinnis, Visiting Assistant Professor, Sociology & Anthropology, Rochester Institute of Technology
Godriver Odhiambo, Associate Professor of History, Le Moyne College
*Danielle Taana Smith, Director of the Honors Program, Professor of African American Studies, Syracuse University